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20110701
20110731
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, a big thank-you to the staff, without mean, this would not have been possible, as usual. thank you very much for all you did. [applause] let me just say, we have a lot of work to do. let's make hay with the sunshine. those involved in the press conference, could you please go immediately to grand ballroom be because we are late. [laughter] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> wrapping up this session of the national governors' association from salt lake city. we just heard from washington state governor, the chair for this summer's conference. we will have more events throughout the weekend. tomorrow afternoon o'clock 30, the session on remembering 9/11, protecting borders and communities. on sunday at 1:30, the closing session. you will also be able to find all the segments on line in their entirety at c-span.org -- online in their entirety at c- span.org. it >> this weekend, live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the net the -- lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker talks competitivenes
call, while we're waiting, is from big sandy, texas. scott is a republican. good morning. caller: yes, susan, if i were a republican and in the negotiations, i would continue to bring up the immorality that the democrats are willing to -- and the fact that they're willing to steal the liberty of future generations with this humongous debt. they need to hold their feet to the fire, and in the end, obama and the democrats will have to come around. there's no doubt about it. we've got the upper hand. even though you've got the press on the president's side, and i want all these democrats that have called in here supporting obama this morning, just ask yourself, are you honestly better off? has his policies actually helped this country? or is it sending this country to oblivion? none of his policies, none of his stimulus, none of it has worked. not one single bit of it. we're worse off now than when he took office, and we're continuing to go downhill. it's time this iron-headed fool relent and let the adults take over. host: thanks for your call. scott from big sandy, texas. here is speak
chart has given a lot over the years. we call it the big shot. in the last few years, change has happened in terms of the long-term stability, brief moments of disturbance, changes in 60 years of stability. we reinvented work practices and other practices. what has happened now is in the last 10 years, we are moving to a different kind of infrastructure proven by the digital loss of competition. now we find having a world in which we have constant disruption nearly every year. the challenge is how do you start to leverage that rather than fear that in terms of driving innovation in? it will not slow down for the next 30 or 40 years. let me say this personally. i can recapitulate the last 10 years of my life. it took me from this class to cloud computing come into graphic processing, that is scientific computing a fraction of the cost, now into a very limited form of competing. i have had to relearn almost everything i knew as a computer scientist. dealing with the plains regarding amazon and microsoft. i had to think about how to move these processing units. there are single proc
on energy prices. by the way, there was a big argument on at in "the economist." what has happened is, information technology greatly increase liquidity has transformed that. there is not a consensus within the financial pages that people talk about the impact of speculation. it is a given. republicans are trying to keep them from doing anything about speculation. those are the had on a tax that we have. there is a more subtle one, this attack on a risk retention. i believe that risk retention is the single most important piece of this bill. you know, the response when we used to say there was a problem, what was supposed to be the substitute for risk retention -- the rating agencies. the rating agencies were the ones. you did not need to have the latter worry about this because you could go ask the rating region -- agencies. now, the rating agencies are trying to overdo it. the people who told us that subprime loans were good are now telling us that it is not good. i think they were wrong in both times. that is one of the things that i really wanted to address now. it does of all me
went to that were big money because i grew up in a middle-class home, it cost $22,000 to go, you played tennis and eight food. host: there are pictures this morning that showed a couple of scenes from inside the white house. this is from "the washington post." this is a picture of first lady betty ford and her daughter susan. the description says, "the first lady and daughter susan killed time and the president's office in 1975. in 1980, the pair lost national breast cancer awareness month. mrs. ford became an awareness for early detection. " there's a picture for 1979 and this shows mrs. ford said in a longtime -- alongside liza minnelli and liza minnelli at studio 54. the next one shows mrs. ford, that she was quite the denser and loved to do so. those pictures are all found in "the washington post"this morning. we're talking about the passing of betty ford died yesterday. we are taking your comments and tweets on the subject. new york, republican line, go ahead. caller: good morning. i want to say a few things. i thought betty ford was very innovative and incredibly supportive and sh
for the tabloids. host: what about the broadsheets? guest: it is known occasionally. there was a big scandal about mp's expenses last year, which came from information that is the voice of -- information that is the will serve and got on a computer disk. my newspaper paid for that because they thought it was in the public interest. that is a rare instance of a broadsheet paper paying for information. for the tabloids, we call it checkbook journalism. salacious information about a night out on the town with a celebrity or pop star or encounters with celebrities. that culture has grown and become more insidious over the past 20 or 30 years. host: how would you describe, to help put it in perspective -- by the way, we will put the numbers on the screen as we continue this conversation about the phone hacking investigation in the u.k. prime minister cameron spoke this morning at a problem about it and we carry that live on c- span -- spoke this morning in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you
money for a tiny wheel, about this big, the onus is on the defense department to get these costs under control. i do not think congress will just let them come especially with the budget coming down, looked the other way. host: megan scully with "national journal." and the piece is called "the pentagon premium." thank you for joining us. we will be back at 7:00 a.m. we go to the floor of the house of representatives. continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: we begin another week in political wonderland. the dow falls 100 points at the opening bell. what is it that we should do? well, if we had the knowledge and problem solving skills of college sophomore economic students or women in a church study group, before the week is out we would establish some simple steps. first, we would understand that in a divided government with real economic challenges no one group is allowed especially those representing a minority of opinion to have their way entirely. we would begin by repealing the silly debt ceiling
with the pie. [unintelligible] host: do you think that this is a big deal at all? in aer: in a way, yes, and a way, no. he is a nice man, but he is too old. it takes a man that this young to do something like that host: do you think you could run all of those companies? caller: me? i am a painter. host: i know. i have your painting in my office. caller: my wife is looking at me and telling me to tell you good morning. host: good morning. send me your e-mail address and i will send you a picture of it in profit -- in my office. caller: listen, my wife's birthday is tomorrow, she turned 81. host: that is right. you married an older woman. mr. peterson, you enjoy that heat wave in texas. we have got to get moving. we appreciate it. this would message, regarding the phone hacking scandal -- host: mike is a republican in arizona. hello. caller: i can see this going on in great britain, i guess the police are involved. but then they are doing it for us in the same manner. scanning e-mails, looking for certain words and what ever. i do not see any difference. i mean, they are exchanging inform
and dime the people who need it most but when it comes to war, there's a big, fat blank check. we need to be honest with ourselves. we need to be honest with each other. across the country, the americans, hard working, tax paying citizens who oppose war. they oppose their hard earned dollars being sent overseas to support 10 long years of war. but let me be clear. they do not oppose paying their taxes. they are not anarchists rr anti-government activists. but as conscientious objectors to war these americans want their taxes invested here at home. think want to provide food for the homeless, pave roads and strong schools. they want medicare and social security to exist for their parents, their children and their grandchildren. they want their tax dollars to care for soldiers and their families when they return home. they will see an end and cure to cancer. they want a cure for aids. they want to see small business thrive. and innovation become the en-in of our economy. they want high speed rail like in asia. they want transit systems that are safe and get people where they knead to go.
advice he can get, and what better than an editor from a big title? so, you were going to have to involve yourself at the top of the media world. otherwise, he will not survive. it has been proven you will not survive because you have to play the game and you have to deal in onion information, which means that. it is a bell making information, providing information. >> if you have someone who is working for you, who works for an organization as under investigation, surely you must smell a rat? the police officers did not do anything wrong. >> if we knew when the investigation was done, we might have the answers to that. the police actually do take action. one of the tactics is to stop complaining. the constables on the street have complaints. they investigated colby and factually. that is what has happened in this case. metropolitan police should have investigated at. -- investigated it. if they want to investigate this and be accepted as truthful and honest investigators, they have to resign. the atmosphere is no one gives them a chance to do this. >> you were involved in the running of
general. general petraeus is leaving to become director of the central intelligence agency. another big story is what is happening with rupert murdoch and his businesses. here's this picture looking at the u.k. hacking scandal and what's happening right now. he will appear before a panel of u.k. lawmakers on tuesday after the phone hacking scandal. today on c-span3 we will bring you the british house of commons at 9:30 morning where rupert murdoch will test suppor -- will testify before a committee. let's go to the phones again, phoenix, arizona, independent mind. caller: i was calling about the balanced budget amendment. we cannot have that. if you amend the constitution, that means the supreme court eventually if gets to decide what that constitutional amendment means. that means every time congress disagrees, which is constantly, if somebody will file an action, take it to federal court, the judge will make a decision, and eventually it will be determined by the supreme court of the u.s. and i don't want lawyers making that decision. that's not what our constitution intended. host: l
the prime minister agree that in the past when the house of commons has been faced with big issues that they have a tendency for knee-jerk overreactions? would you agree that newspapers are a force for good in this country and we need criminality weeded out of the media but not impose on a free speech or prepress? >> my hon. friend is entirely right. we need to make sure as the house of commons, as the government, in the debate that we have to show an element of restraint in regulation of the media because there's always a danger that the pendulum will swing too far the other way and we threaten investigative journalism, a strong and independent media that can hold government to account. when we consider some of the scandals that have been uncovered, it is often the press that does this. it is absolutely vital to maintain their british tradition. >> rebekah brooks described the prime minister as a friend and neighbor. we heard about christmas walks and conversations. >> order. this is the moment in parliament where we have a free speech. this question will be heard. that is the end
. >> so things like use of petty cash -- that could be quite big sums of money or small -- at the moment you just record that the journalist gave it to somebody. >> yes, and i don't have direct knowledge of all of those arrangements. >> i was going to ask if payments could have been made to family members of those alleged to have been hacked and similar, but is it possible that other forms of remuneration can be used in your company apart from cash and bank transfers? i am talking of things like travelers checks, vouchers and things that can be redeemed for cash. >> i don't have knowledge of that. >> just looking at some of your corporate governance -- page 2 and page 4 of your own code -- it mentions directors, employees and officers of news corporation acting to the principles set forth, including consultants, agents, suppliers and business partners adhering to the standards. it says, "we may never ask a third party to perform any act that would violate these standards." can you tell me a little bit more, especially on the financial side, how you, as an organization, try and make that
couldn't get along well enough in those days to spend more money on big programs. there was legislation that was passed that supported in a bipartisan way by president clinton and republicans in congress to limit spending. so there was some spending restraint. but the reality is the last time we had our fiscal house in order and were spending less money than we were taking in was a time in which the economy was growing. if we really want to address the issue of balancing our budget, we should focus much more attention than we have on growing the economy, putting people to work and allowing as they work that the taxes will be collected. the greatest opportunity we have to improve people's lives is to create an environment in which jobs are created, in which employers feel comfortable in investing in the future and buying plant and equipment and putting people to work. and so while it's cut, cap and balance today, we need to make certain we don't forget, in my view, that fourth component: grow the economy. and in my view, that means a tax code that is certain and fair, that doesn't change
to sitting democrats. that laid the later on it says mr. obama and mr. boehner seem united to pursue as big a deal as possible. next is a call from clinton, new jersey. jean, a republican. caller: i think a great way to trim the budget would be the $1 trillion we spend on the war on drugs in the past 40 years, since president nixon started this. in fact, a representative steve cohen from tennessee on june 15 was very brave and stood up and gave a five-minute talk in front of the house of representatives and one -- went through what a failure of this has been. $1 trillion so far. for example, it is about $10,000 per marijuana arrest. new york city, which definitely has financial problems, 50,000 marijuana arrests over the past year. i know many states, including new jersey, have medical marijuana laws now but my governor will not enact the medical marijuana procedures that has been passed by the legislature because marijuana is scheduled i and he cannot get assurances from the justice department that state employees who are doing this health program will not be arrested. host: from new jerse
. they were not told. is it not there? he did exactly what they should not do. >> he makes a very big point. when you see what he said, he saw that it was cleared in advance. we do not live in a country or the prime minister's ordering who should be arrested. >> he made a statement on monday. there were two words that were not mentioned. we were not in a situation where his best buddy was working for us. did he know that neil wallace was giving advice? >> no. . i did not know that. i was unaware of that. i think this is important. one of the issues is the transparency and information that there was. there was no hiding the fact that they had this. >> i want to thank you for the announcement. he has said that all governments have been far too close to the media giants. that means no more back door living to no. 10. there are cabinet papers. there are recommendations for it to be implemented. >> i accept the plea make about transparency. there are of official business meetings with media executives. with relation, the fact is not whether he came in through the back or front door, but was it d
with this question. tomorrow, at your turn 40 years old. what are your hopes for the future? >> there is a big future. that is a future where we are all able to freely communicate our hopes and dreams and the historical record is an item that is completely -- it could never be changed, deleted, modified. that is something is -- that is my lifelong quest to do. from that, justice lows. -- flows. most of us are reasonably intelligent. if we communicate with each other, organize, and know what is going 9, and that is pretty much what it is all about. in the short term, it is that my staff stopped hassling. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> the head of the national institute of health talks about science and innovation in the u.s.. the state department calls on the syrian government to withdraw troops. that briefing is later. in case you just missed it, wikileaks founder in a forum in london. >> on tomorrows "washington journal," we continue our discussion on federal spending and the national debt. after that, pe
, conspired to smear lord ashcroft, and members opposite -- big discounts in order to try to undermine this. he knew about this then. why was nothing done? >> i have to say to the house that i am surprised that this debate, which started with our desire to protect the life of innocent children, should end up with the conservative party more interested in defending lord ashcroft. mr. speaker, i would have thought, i would have thought, that if the honorable member felt there were so many abuses in news international that he knew about at the time, then he would have advised the then leader of the opposition. >> i think the member for giving way. giving way. it is nice to see him in the chamber. >> listen carefully to the honorable member. listen carefully. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i have listened to the honorable member as he has outlined this. can i ask him, does he regret that the previous government held a slumber party for rupert murdoch and for rebekah at checkers? >> i have come to a debate on the future of the media on an issue where the prime minister of this country is set to answ
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